St Joseph and St Mary Parishes in Freeport, IL

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Holy Day of Obligation, August 15

August 15 is a Holy Day of Obligation. All Catholics are obliged to attend Mass for the feast day of Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Mass times are as follows:

  • 8am Mass in St Joseph Church
  • 8am Mass in St Mary Church
  • 5:30opm Mass in Joseph Church
  • 7pm Mass in St Mary Church (Spanish)


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Symbolism in the Church #22

We have some flags in our Church. They are the Papal flag (also known as the Vatican flag), two American flags and the flag of the Knights of Columbus. The Knights of Columbus are a group of men that got together in response to the Catholic Irish persecutions about the turn of the century (1900). Irish Catholics were having a hard time finding jobs here in America. They left the persecutions in Ireland as they were denied the ability to purchase food there. At least they could eat if they could find work and get the food. There were many signs in windows at the time that read, “Irish Catholics need not apply,” meaning they would not get the job. Various organizations would work hard at making sure Catholics could not work. The only jobs that were available were jobs with high death rates. These jobs were particularly working on the high wires and police. Many Irish Catholics died hanging wires on the power lines. This is before the unions were established. So many men were dying, it is said that the life expectancy for Irish males was 35 years of age. So Father McGivney helped establish the Knights by offering fellowship and life insurance. The Knights promised to help each other’s families when the father died. They quickly grew because of the great need. God, country and family are their priorities, in that order. Today they have grown so much and offer so much more. They do a super amount of good with all the fundraising and offering events for the handicap, church and women’s health by offering ultra-sounds for other non-profit organizations. This group of faithful men do more than we can appreciate. This is their flag, and we are proud of what they have done for the community. Continue reading


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July Food Truck

On a hot sweltering day, one hundred twenty-nine persons lined up to receive free groceries from the Northern Illinois Mobile Food Pantry. Approximately 7,300 pounds of free groceries were distributed, which fed four hundred and fourteen family members.
Many thanks to the following volunteers: Jan Ackerman; Kim Alber; Paul Brown; Candy Daacon; Heather, Anna, Grace and Clare Dailey; Don Davis; Steve and Peg Ehlbeck; Ruth Geary; Joe Ginger; John Guenther; Karen Hildebrand; Mike Kavran; Charles Koppi; Jan Krieger; Betty McKenna; Laverne Mensen; Laura and Asea Mills; Carol Mullens; Donna Nevenhoven; Bobbi Nicklaus; Ann Sauer; Lana Schuck; Frank and Sandra Steiner; Pat Weigel; and Millie Whitford.
I am very grateful to all who gave of their time to help those in our community who are in need of a helping hand. God Bless. — Mary Koppi


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Symbolism in the Church #21

The stained glass above the main entry doors has the beautiful gothic arch with two keys crossing each other. These are the keys of Peter. They symbolize the meaning in the Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 16, when Jesus tells Peter, “and I will give you the keys of the Kingdom of heaven” (v19). This was given to St Peter himself and not the other disciples. Even in the early church by the year 200, St Clement of Alexandria said, “The blessed Peter, the Chosen, the preeminent, the first among the disciples for to whom alone…” (Who is the rich man saved). Tertullian wrote in the year 211, “remember that the Lord left the keys of it (heaven) to Peter here, and through him to the Church” (Antidote Against the Scorpion). So we can see from very early in Christendom, it was taught about Peter and his primacy and authority to bring God’s mercy to all.

Peter is depicted many times to have the keys in his hands. It is the first statue we see on top of the wall when coming into the Vatican square. We look for that statue because we have seen so many pictures of it. They are keys, but not a sword. Peter has been charged by God to bring as many people as possible to His mercy. Jesus prefers mercy (Mt 9:13). He trained his disciples in that particular ministry culminating in the crucifixion. Then He said, “come follow Me” (Jn 21:19). These keys are depicted above the doors, hoping that this mercy may be extended to all who pass through these doors.
On the right side over the doors is an image of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. This has specific devotions. The Immaculate Heart is depicted by a heart crowned with roses, the sword pierces the heart, and lilies come out of the top of the heart. The sword should remind us of the Gospel of Luke when Simeon says, “and your heart too, a sword shall pierce” talking to Mary, the mother of Jesus (Luke 2:35). Jesus died on the cross for us and Mary; His mother was with Him all the way through. She was there even after His death when the soldiers pierced His heart and out came blood and water (Jn 19:34). Moms have special relationships with their sons. What the sons experiences, the mothers experience, and it was no different with Mary and Jesus. Jesus’ heart was pierced, and so Mary’s heart was pierced as they were bound by love.
Mary represents humanity, and so the roses are given to her to give to all God’s children. She was immaculate, reminding us that as she was preserved from sin by the power of God, so we will be washed clean from sin by the power of God. Jesus gives his mother roses, as she gave him his humanity. We are now bound to Jesus in our humanity. He is our brother in humanity. Of course, Jesus loves His mother, but He loves each and every one of us. Nothing else could explain why He would want to die on the cross for us. Without Jesus on the cross, Mary could not be saved. The lilies on top of the heart represent purity. Her love for Jesus remained pure like most mothers for their children, the difference being that her child is God.
On the left side above the doors is an image of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. This is depicted very similarly to the Immaculate heart, but this heart has a crown of thorns. Roses have thorns. I picture Jesus picking roses for Mary; He took the thorns and gave to roses to Mary, and Mary gives them to us. Doesn’t that fit the description of Jesus? It is how we understand Mary as Catholics. Jesus is always willing to take the thorns, just to give us many roses. The sword represents the pierced heart of Jesus after His death on the cross. The cross is to remind us how He loved us, and of His power to save us in this life and the next. There is much more to this image and devotion which I encourage you to study.